ANAK, ANAKIM

ANAK, ANAKIM (Heb. עֲנָק, עֲנוֹק, עֲנָקִים), son of Arba (Josh. 15:13; 21:11), and a giant people of southern Ereẓ Israel (called Anakim, BeneiʿAnak, and BeneiʿAnakim). According to Joshua 14:15, Arba, to whom the city of hebron owed its ancient name of Kiriath-Arba, was the greatest of the Anakim, and according to Joshua 15:13 he was the father of "the Anak."   From the time when the Israelite spies explored the region of Hebron to the time when it was conquered by Caleb, it was inhabited by Ahiman, Sheshai, and Talmai , who were "born of the Anak" (yelidei ha-ʿAnak, Num. 13:22; or "children of the Anak," Josh. 15:14). The Anakim are described as nephilim (Num. 13:33), a term which is probably used here virtually as a common name for giants (cf. Gen. 6:4), much as titan(s) is used today. In Deuteronomy 2:21 (cf. 1:28) the great stature of Anakim is referred to. Such traditions about an ancient race of giants were apparently current in Israel, Ammon, and Moab (see rephaim ). Most biblical references connect the Anakim with Hebron (Num. 13:22; et al.), but Joshua 11:21–22 indicates that they occupied a wider area. It is not known whether the Iy-ʿnq of the Egyptian Execration Texts (first half of the second millennium B.C.E.) are connected with the biblical Anakim. The three rulers of the former bear Semitic names (Pritchard, Texts, 328), whereas the names of Ahiman, Sheshai, and Talmai have exact affinities with Hurrian names (cf. de Vaux, in RB, 55 (1948), 326, no. 1). The term anak is used in Modern Hebrew for a giant. -BIBLIOGRAPHY: W.F. Albright, in: JPOS, 8 (1928), 223–56; Wright, in: JBL, 57 (1938), 305–9; B. Mazar, in: Sefer Dinaburg (1949), 321; Albright, in: JPOS, 8 (1928), 223–56. ADD. BIBLIOGRAPHY: O. Margalith, in: Beit Mikra, 25 (1986), 359–64.

Encyclopedia Judaica. 1971.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Anakim — Nephilim Pour les articles homonymes, voir Nephilim (homonymie). Mot hébreu qui signifie “ceux qui font tomber les autres”, souvent traduit par géants dans la Bible mais parfois rendu tel quel. C est la forme plurielle du mot hébreu nāphîl.… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Anak — According to the Book of Numbers, during the conquest of Canaan by the Israelites, Anak (spelt as both ענק and as הענק depending upon the reference) was a well known figure, and a forefather of the Anakites (aka. Anakim) who were strong and tall… …   Wikipedia

  • ANAK Society — The ANAK Society is the oldest known secret society and honor society based at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Founded in 1908, ANAK s purpose is to honor outstanding juniors and seniors who have shown …   Wikipedia

  • Anakim —    The descendants of Anak (Josh. 11:21; Num. 13:33; Deut. 9:2). They dwelt in the south of Palestine, in the neighbourhood of Hebron (Gen. 23:2; Josh. 15:13). In the days of Abraham (Gen. 14:5, 6) they inhabited the region afterwards known as… …   Easton's Bible Dictionary

  • Anakim — noun From the Bible [ …   Wiktionary

  • Anak —    Long necked, the son of Arba, father of the Anakim (Josh. 15:13; 21:11, Heb. Anok) …   Easton's Bible Dictionary

  • HEBRON — (Heb. חֶבְרוֹן; Ar. al Khalīl), city in Ereẓ Israel, 19 mi. (32 km.) S. of Jerusalem in the Judean Hills, 3,050 ft. (930 m.) above sea level. The name Hebron is explained as deriving from the root ḥbr (friend), the name Ḫabiru , or the Arabic… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Avvim — Nephilim Pour les articles homonymes, voir Nephilim (homonymie). Mot hébreu qui signifie “ceux qui font tomber les autres”, souvent traduit par géants dans la Bible mais parfois rendu tel quel. C est la forme plurielle du mot hébreu nāphîl.… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Emim — Nephilim Pour les articles homonymes, voir Nephilim (homonymie). Mot hébreu qui signifie “ceux qui font tomber les autres”, souvent traduit par géants dans la Bible mais parfois rendu tel quel. C est la forme plurielle du mot hébreu nāphîl.… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Horites — Nephilim Pour les articles homonymes, voir Nephilim (homonymie). Mot hébreu qui signifie “ceux qui font tomber les autres”, souvent traduit par géants dans la Bible mais parfois rendu tel quel. C est la forme plurielle du mot hébreu nāphîl.… …   Wikipédia en Français

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